3 Kinds of Homeowners Insurance You Can (and Should) Add to Your Policy

3 Kinds of Homeowners Insurance You Can (and Should) Add to Your Policy

Insurance can be complex and vary by state and region. Depending on where you live and what catastrophes are most likely to hit your home, your best plan may include an add-on policy or two that will cover you in case of disaster. No matter what you add on, talk with your insurance agent to make sure your home is protected.

Sinkhole Coverage

If you live in an area where sinkholes occur, adding sinkhole coverage to your policy can be a smart move. For residents seeking homeowners insurance Daytona Beach FL, where more sinkholes occur than in any other state, making certain this policy feature is in place can mean the difference between being able to repair your home after a sinkhole or finding yourself in the hole, financially speaking.

Tornado Coverage

Tornados happen fast. They can produce rain, hail, and home-annihilating wind. While most homeowners insurance covers damage from unruly weather, many homeowners have discovered too late that their insurance isn’t sufficient to recover their losses after a tornado. Residents living in tornado-prone areas can often add extra coverage to make sure they won’t be left out in the cold after the skies have cleared.

Hurricane Coverage

The most famous and most devastating hurricane in U.S. history was Katrina in 2008. It was also the most costly, resulting in an estimated $163 billion in damage. Falling trees, flying debris and flooding are just some of the risks when a hurricane hits. Homes in high-risk areas like coastlines can be harder to insure against hurricanes. Residents living in areas at risk are smart to add on coverage specifically for damage inflicted by these storms.

Navigating the intricacies of a homeowners insurance policy that will make or break your rebuilding and recovery efforts after a disaster can be daunting. Talk with your insurance agent to make sure you have the right coverage for recovery before natural disaster strikes.

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